t f l v r
_

research blog

international dawn chorus day: 1 May

early shots from fast|slow|complex

These are some early shots from the installations. More documentation next week.

 

waste land (detail) 2013

 

fast|slow|complex by Perdita Phillips at Spectrum project space, Edith Cowan University Mount Lawley Campus, 19 February to 1 March 2013

Artist’s talks Saturday 23 February 2:30pm and Wednesday 27 February 11:00am

Tuesday to Friday 10:00am to 6:00pm
Saturday 23 February 12:00pm to 5:00 pm

Please join us for the exhibition’s concluding event on Thursday 28 February at 5:00 to 8:00pm

waste land (detail) 2013

 

fast|slow|complex by Perdita Phillips presents a rigorous body of work from this distinctive Western Australian artist. The exhibition combines investigations into themes of waste and wastelands, with explorations of disaster and transformation born from post-disaster environments.

The works showcase the artist’s agility in a diverse range of media, including drawing, video and sculpture. fast|slow|complex marks a crystallisation of Phillips’ practice of examining the parallels and complexities within the living world, with a new reflective focus on recuperative socioecological strategies for the future. The artworks contain oblique suggestions of hope in an ‘unruly’ world of complexity and flux. Burdens are lightened and wastefulness is replaced by elegant and thrifty recuperative strategies.

spectrum project space
http://sca.edu.ecu.au/projects/spectrum
Building 3 Room 3.191
Edith Cowan University
Mount Lawley Campus WA 6050

the secret cyclone (detail) 2013

 

For bus services see https://www.ecu.edu.au/about-ecu/getting-to-ecu/getting-to-mount-lawley-campus and http://www.transperth.wa.gov.au/. Parking free on Saturday 23rd.

32 things to do (detail) 2013

fast | slow | complex exhibition opening

FAST | SLOW | COMPLEX at spectrum project space

You are invited to fast|slow|complex at Spectrum project space 19 February to 1 March 2013

fast|slow|complex> by Perdita Phillips presents an rigorous body of work from this distinctive Western Australian artist. The exhibition combines investigations into themes of waste and wastelands, with explorations of disaster and transformation born from post-disaster environments.

The works showcase the artist’s agility in a diverse range of media, including drawing, video and sculpture. fast|slow|complex marks a crystallisation of Phillips’ practice of examining the parallels and complexities within the living world, with a new reflective focus on recuperative socioecological strategies for the future. The artworks contain oblique suggestions of hope in an ‘unruly’ world of complexity and flux. Burdens are lightened and wastefulness is replaced by elegant and thrifty recuperative strategies.

Please join us for the exhibition’s concluding event on Thursday 28 February at 5:00pm

Artist’s talks Saturday 23 February 2:30pm and Wednesday 27 February 11:00am

Spectrum project space
Building 3 Room 3.191
Edith Cowan University
Mount Lawley Campus WA 6050
Tuesday to Friday 10:00am to 6:00pm
Saturday 12:00pm to 5:00 pm

the event of a thread by Ann Hamilton

filmed by ARTINFO

Shy (dissolution + exchange) installation shots

 

Even though the Shy (dissolution + exchange) project is expected to take up to two years to complete, the in-progress work was shown at PICA (until 20 October 2012). Here are some quick shots of the installation (hand held, no lighting).

Shy (dissolution + exchange) by Perdita Phillips and 62 collaborators 2012+ image copyright Perdita Phillips -- the installation almost finished -- the blank square is where the animation is visible.

The installation almost finished — the blank square is where the animation is visible. The wallk work is 2.67 x 1.47 m. The first image is in the bottom left hand corner, running left to right to the tip right hand corner. As photocopies arrive the place-holder image is replaced. At the moment the first 9 photocopies have arrived.

 

touching up the computer monitor screen (installed behind a false wall)

touching up around the computer monitor screen (installed behind a false wall)

Shy (dissolution + exchange) by Perdita Phillips and 62 collaborators 2012+ image copyright Perdita Phillips

detail of table located next to the wall piece with received envelopes (taken during the install)

 

You can find out more about the yonder exhibition here http://www.pica.org.au/view/Yonder/1524 and the artwork is listed here http://www.perditaphillips.com/portfolio/shy-dissolution-exchange/

the world of fast; the world of deep

the world of fast
the world of deep

Discuss.

incurable disease strikes the outback

[Hattah Lakes Storylines Murray Bourcher and Environment Australia 2008]

zombies again…

But the body remains. Vacancy does not mean death. In fact, it means a different form of hungered life… It is a body with organs that has a complicated relationship with its cerebral partner. That body strapped into the car will suffer and be crushed on impact. The body that walks into traffic suffers a similar fate.

And as the mind continues to accept that this vulnerable corpse must be protected, the world around us will shift to accommodate the zombie multitude.

http://natothompson.wordpress.com/2012/05/10/leaving-the-body-behind/

paper presented at Regarding the Earth: Ecological Vision in Word and Image

My paper Constructing a resilience aesthetic in the face of zombie environmentalism was presented at Regarding the Earth: Ecological Vision in Word and Image on the weekend:

A recent trend in twenty-first century relations with the natural world has been a ‘darkening’ in the tone of debate. The popularity of the zombie as a cultural symbol points towards our apparent attraction to the ‘dark side’ where polluted environmental conditions make for ‘sexy’ contemporary art. Disengagement with the consequences of individual or collective behaviours leaves plenty of scope for an alternative aesthetics of complexity and connection. Countering a certain tendency in environmentalism for retreating from disaster and ‘battening down the hatches,’ I will mobilise concepts of ecological complexity, resilience and advances in adaptive management, drawing attention to existing artworks and artists exploring a conception of the world as a network of dynamic ecological circumstances. Eight potential directions for critical future creative works will be discussed. The paper invites an aesthetics of action in the face of the inevitable uncertainties inherent in an ecological world view.

The last passenger pigeon

The last passenger pigeon the world will ever know died on September 1, 1914